[Free eBook] Nut Country: Right-Wing Dallas and the Birth of the Southern Strategy by Edward H. Miller [US Political History & Analysis]

Nut Country: Right-Wing Dallas and the Birth of the Southern Strategy by Edward H. Miller, an assistant teaching professor at Northeastern University Global, is a 20th century political history, free for a limited time courtesy of the University of Chicago Press.

This is their featured Free Book of the Month for October.

The accessibly-written book examines the history and lingering impact behind the US Republican Party’s “Southern strategy” begun during the 1960s as the party began to appeal to ultraconservative, religious, and special interest groups displeased by the sweeping changes of the decade in order to increase its political support, with especial attention paid to the seeds and rise of the movement in Dallas, Texas, in the wake of the assassination of Democrat President John F. Kennedy.

Offered worldwide through October, available directly from the university’s website.

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[Free eBooks] 10 nonfiction books from Verso [Art, Architecture, History, Philosophy, Environment, Social Issues, Political Theory, Etc.]

As a special tie in to their “50 % off Student Reading Sale”, publisher Verso Books are giving away free ebook copies of selected non-fiction titles in their quasi-academic line of philosophical, political, artistic, and social history, commentary, and analysis.

The selection includes the following 10 titles across various subjects, which you can claim via the blog announcement page by switching to “Ebook” tab for each book and clicking “Add to Cart” (DRM-free watermarked ePub/Mobi, requires account signup with valid email address but no payment info):

  • Grand Hotel Abyss: The Lives of the Frankfurt School by Stuart Jeffries (20th C intellectual movement history)
  • Beyond Black and White: From Civil Rights to Barack Obama by Manning Marable (race relations)
  • The Formation of the Economic Thought of Karl Marx: 1843 to Capital by Ernest Mandel (economic theory)
  • Metaphilosophy by Henri Lefebvre (French philosopher manifesto)
  • The Exform by Nicholas Bourriad (art theory and criticism)
  • Women’s Oppression Today: The Marxist/Feminist Encounter by Michèle Barrett (contemporary feminism)
  • Marx and Human Nature: Reflections of a Legend by Norman Geras (philosophy)
  • Screened Out by Jean Baudrillard (journalist essays)
  • All Over the Map: Writing on Buildings and Cities by Michael Sorkin (urban architecture)
  • Climate Leviathan: A Political Theory of Our Planetary Future by Jeff Mann and Joel Wainwright (environmental political issues)

Offered DRM-free worldwide until just before midnight Pacific Time on September 30th, available directly from the publisher.

[Free eBook] Wasted World: How Our Consumption Challenges the Planet by Rob Hengeveld [Ecology Science Issues & Sociopolitical History]

Wasted World: How Our Consumption Challenges the Planet by Rob Hengeveld, a biologist and former honorary professor in the Department of Animal Ecology at the Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, is environmental and social science current affairs and history, free for a limited time courtesy of the University of Chicago Press.

This is their featured Free Book of the Month for September.

This accessibly-written book explains the natural and industrial processes of resource usage and recycling, also tracing the human connection and effects of overconsumption, overpopulation, and pollution and their consequences throughout worldwide history as well as in current and potential future times.

Offered worldwide through September, available directly from the university’s website.

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[Free eBook] Geisha: The Secret History of a Vanishing World by Lesley Downer [Japan Cultural History & Ethnographic Expat Memoir]

Geisha: The Secret History of a Vanishing World by English author Lesley Downer, a former expat in Japan, journalist and historical novelist, is an ethnographic cultural history and expat memoir, free for a limited time courtesy of publisher Endeavour Press.

This was originally published in 2000 by Headline Books.

The book presents an accessibly-written cultural history cum personal ethnographic memoir of Japan’s geisha—from the predecessors of the profession in the artistically accomplished ladies-in-waiting of the Heian period, to the courtesans of later eras, to the present day—and the various other professions that grew up around supporting them, some passing down the family business through centuries, with the author herself invited to spend several months experiencing the training and daily activities of the geisha in Kyoto while living among them.

Offered worldwide, available at Amazon.

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[Free eBook] The Last Asylum: A Memoir of Madness in Our Times by Barbara Taylor [Award-Nominated 20th C Mental Health Treatment History & Memoir]

The Last Asylum: A Memoir of Madness in Our Times by Canadian expat UK-resident author Barbara Taylor, an historian and professor of humanities at Queen Mary University of London, is a retrospective memoir cum history of mental health asylum treatment, free for a limited time courtesy of the University of Chicago Press.

This is their featured Free Book of the Month for April, and was a finalist for the 2015 RBC Taylor Prize for best Canadian work of literary non-fiction.

The memoir recounts the author’s decades-long struggle with anxiety, which eventually became severe enough to lead to a stay at the historic Friern Mental Hospital in North London in the 1980s, and the perception and treatment of mental illness in England during a turning point era which led to the closing of many asylums and the changes as their former patients were funneled into underfunded community care to mostly fend for themselves, with limited support available from knowledgeable professionals and loyal friends coping with their own mental health issues.

Offered worldwide through April, available directly from the university’s website.

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[Free eBook] Edwardian England, 1901-1915: Society and Politics by Donald Read [Early 20th C History]

Edwardian England, 1901-1915: Society and Politics by the late British author Donald Read, an emeritus Professor of Modern English History at the University of Kent, is an early 20th century British sociopolitical history, free for a limited time courtesy of publisher Endeavour Press.

This was originally published in 1972 by The History Book Club.

The book provides an accessibly-written introductory overview with a bit of deeper analysis, aiming to clear up some common misconceptions (circa the 1970s) about the roots and effects of the pivotal changes at the turn of the 20th century as Victorian England rapidly modernized into the Edwardian Era within the shifting national and world political climate and its accompanying societal changes, with chapters devoted to urban/rural labour and class divisions, the scope of the British Empire and its international relations, the increasing rights of women, ongoing issues with Ireland, and the overall state of England leading into World War I.

Offered worldwide, available at Amazon.

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[Free eBook] One Hour in Paris: A True Story of Rape and Recovery by Karyn L. Freedman [Award-Winning Philosophical Memoir]

One Hour in Paris: A True Story of Rape and Recovery by Canadian author Karyn L. Freedman, an associate professor of philosophy at the University of Guelph, is an exploratory trauma recovery and treatment memoir, free for a limited time courtesy of the University of Chicago Press.

This is their featured Free Book of the Month for November and was a recipient of the 2015 British Columbia National Award for Canadian Non-Fiction, shortlisted for the 2015 Alberta Book of the Year, and was also featured in the Globe and Mail‘s Top 100 Books of 2014 as well as the CBC Reads 2017 Longlist.

The memoir is a globe-trotting philosophical meditation about the immediate and long-term effects of the author’s own experience with the trauma and recovery from being raped in 1990 and her travels in search of justice and treatment over the decades since then, as well as the broader effects of sexual violence and gender inequality in society throughout history, drawing upon insights from recent neuroscientific and psychological research to examine how recovery becomes possible for survivors.

Offered worldwide through November, available directly from the university’s website.

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[Free eBook] The English Bible and the Seventeenth Century Revolution by Christopher Hill [17th C British Sociocultural History]

The English Bible and the Seventeenth Century Revolution by the late British author Christopher Hill, an historian specializing in 17th century England and a former Master of Oxford University’s Balliol College, is a 1sociocultural and political history, free for a limited time courtesy of publisher Endeavour Press.

This was originally published in 1993 by Penguin Books.

The book provides an in-depth historical overview of the social, cultural, and political impact of the ready availability of English-language translations of the Bible to the commoner masses in the 17th century in Britain (a then-radical change from the Latin and Greek versions only readable by the educated upper classes and clergy), in the form of topical chapters covering the differing versions printed, and then addressing its revolutionary influence on everyday society, literature, conflicts with assorted religious movements and the ensuing English Civil War, philosophical arguments and approaches towards poverty and liberty, and other aspects of post-Reformation British life.

Offered worldwide, available at Amazon.

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[Free eBooks] 15 titles from Verso Books [Academic, Culture, History, Philosophy, Politics, Etc.]

As a special treat to mark the end of back-to-school month, publisher Verso Books are offering a repeat of the 15 titles from their September flash giveaways accompanying their still-ongoing 50% off Student Reading sale, in case anyone missed them earlier.

The titles include a mix of quasi-academic history (ancient and recent), political and economic philosophy, arts & culture, social and gender studies, and other related topics written by authors worldwide, selected from their promotional recommendation lists during the Student Reading sale.

This is the list, and you can pick them all up from their dedicated promo blogpost here (wait for everything to load, then click to switch to “Ebook” for each title before adding to cart; requires account signup with billing address but no payment info) through this weekend:

  • Capitalism, Socialism, Ecology by André Gorz, from the Environment & Ecology recommended reading list
  • Bad New Days by Hal Foster, from Art & Aesthetics
  • Darkwater by W.E.B. Du Bois, from Race & Ethnicity
  • Building the Commune by George Ciccariello-Maher, from Sociology
  • Fictitious Capital by Cédric Durand, from Economics
  • Invisibility Blues by Michele Wallace, from Feminism and Gender
  • Democracy Against Capitalism by Ellen Meiksins Wood from Political Theory
  • Read My Desire by Joan Copjec, from Psychoanalysis
  • Good Neighbors by Sylvie Tissot, from Architecture & Cities
  • Peasant-Citizen and Slave by Ellen Meiksins Wood, from History (is about ancient Greece)
  • Politics and Letters by Raymond Williams, from Cultural & Literary Theory
  • Cultural Capital by Robert Hewison, from Film & Media
  • The Left Hemisphere by Razmig Keucheyan, from Critical Theory
  • The Philosophy of Marx by Etienne Balibar, from Philosophy
  • Homo Juridicus by Alain Supiot, from Anthropology

Offered worldwide through 11:59 PM Eastern Time on September 30th, available DRM-free (ePub & Mobi, watermarked with your email address but otherwise freely transferrable to all your devices) directly from the publisher.

[Free eBook] Poverty and the Industrial Revolution by Brian Inglis [18th-19th C Socioeconomic History]

Poverty and the Industrial Revolution by the late Irish author Brian Inglis, a journalist, historian, and television presenter best known for the All Our Yesterdays historical documentary series, is a standalone 18th-19th century British socioeconomic history, free for a limited time courtesy of publisher Endeavour Press.

This was originally published in 1971 by Hodder & Stoughton.

This examines the background behind and immediate and lingering effects of the changes in British economy and society as a result of the Industrial Revolution, with its impacts upon agriculture and manufacturing and the ensuing lives of the lower classes as machinery and other “modern” techniques made their traditional burden of manual labour lighter even as it made the value of their labour worth less to landowners, accompanied by speculation on lessons to be learned and applied to the increasingly automation-filled present day (circa the 1970s).

Offered worldwide, available at Amazon.

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