[Free eBook] Philip Sparrow Tells All: Lost Essays by Samuel Steward, Writer, Professor, Tattoo Artist [1940s Cultural History, Travel, & LGBT Essays]

Philip Sparrow Tells All: Lost Essays by Samuel Steward, Writer, Professor, Tattoo Artist by the late Samuel Steward, a poet, novelist, and university professor turned tattoo artist and LGBT erotica writer, edited by Jeremy Mulderig with a foreword by Jason Spring, is a collection of mid-20th culture and life experience essays, free for a limited time courtesy of the University of Chicago Press.

This is their featured Free Book of the Month for June, and this collection assembles an selection of columns originally printed during the 1940s in the Illinois Dental Journal, an obscure publication which allowed the author to write freely on eclectic subject matter drawn from a broad variety of life experience.

The essays are thoroughly annotated by editor Mulderig, giving cultural and historical context, as well as explaining various allusions and the gay subtext which Steward, who would later become an erotic novelist under the pennames Philip Sparrow and Phil Andros, liked to lace his columns with, unbeknownst to his dentist audience. Topics include his friendships with famous literary authors Gertrude Stein and Thornton Wilder, his stints as a holiday sales clerk and opera and ballet extra, his travels to unusual destinations such as a bodybuilding competition and pet cemetary as well as more conventional trips to Paris and Algiers, and much more.

Offered worldwide through June, available directly from the university’s website.

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[Free eBook] Cicely: The Story of a Doctor by Ann Dally [Pioneering Medical Biography]

Cicely: The Story of a Doctor by the late English author Ann Dally, a psychiatrist turned medical historian, is a vintage biography of a pioneering historical medical figure, free for a limited time courtesy of publisher Endeavour Press.

This was originally published in 1968 by Victor Gollancz.

This biography of mid-20th century Jamaican physician Cicely Williams, who discovered and researched the malnutrition condition kwashiorkor and was appointed the first director of Mother and Child Health at the World Health Organization, covers her life up until 1945 and her journeys throughout the world as an open-minded colonial doctor who paid attention to local traditional knowledge, and took care of others while imprisoned in an internment camp in Malaya during World War II, among other experiences in an apparently remarkable life.

Offered worldwide, available at Amazon.

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[Free eBook] A Company of Heroes: The American Frontier, 1775-1783 by Dale Van Every [US Western & Native History]

A Company of Heroes: The American Frontier, 1775-1783 by the late Dale Van Every, an early Hollywood screenwriter and film producer, is a vintage US history, free for a limited time courtesy of publisher Endeavour Press’ Endeavour Media imprint.

This was originally published in 1962 by William Morrow.

The book explores the lesser-known western frontier of the US Revolutionary War in the “backcountry” regions where the British also recruited Native American allies into their brutal conflict with the rebellious colonials, focusing especially upon the exploits of Mohawk leader Joseph Brant and American officer George Rogers Clark

Offered worldwide, available at Amazon.

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[Free Audiobooks] Come August, Come Freedom by Gigi Amateau & My Name Is Not Friday by Jon Walter [Young Adult Historical]

AudioFile’s SYNC Summer of Listening 2018 promotion for young adults offers 2 free audiobooks per week—1 classic or non-fiction, 1 modern—as free MP3 downloads, usually available worldwide (some titles are subject to geo-restrictions, and you can see the planned release schedule here).

This week’s two selected titles, which have a theme of slavery and freedom in US history, available until 7am Eastern Time on June 21st, are as follows:

  • Come August, Come Freedom: The Bellows, The Gallows, and the Black General Gabriel by Gigi Amateau, a YA biographical novel narrative, intertwined with readings from actual surviving historical documents, about Gabriel, an enslaved blacksmith who, inspired by the revolution in Haiti, planned a large-scale slave rebellion in Virginia at the turn of the 19th century which eventually had significant repercussions for decades afterwards; read by JD Jackson, from Candlewick on Brilliance Audio, available worldwide
  • My Name is Not Friday by Jon Walter, a YA historical novel set during the US Civil War, starring an orphaned black boy who is sold from freedom in the North into slavery in the South and must make his way back again; read by Dion Graham, from Scholastic Audio, available in most countries worldwide (excluding UK & Ireland)

Offered as DRM-free MP3s through 7am Eastern Time on June 21st, available in selected countries worldwide (requires installing Overdrive Media console software on your PC, Mac, Android, or iDevice, and you need to finish downloading before the time limit).

[Free eBook] White Mischief: A Cultural History of Cocaine by Tim Madge [History & Current Affairs]

White Mischief: A Cultural History of Cocaine by British author Tim Madge, an historian and journalist, is a cultural and political history of the drug, free for a limited time courtesy of publisher Endeavour Press.

This was originally published in 2001 by Mainstream Publishing and this reprint comes with a brand new foreword commenting on the changes (or lack of them) in policy in the past two decades.

This covers the history of the uses and abuses of various forms of cocaine, from its origins as the revered coca leaf in South America and early favourable image as a miracle drug in 19th century Europe and the US to its eventual banning and subsequent re-emergence as a 20th century recreational drug for high-rollers, as well as exploring the policies which arose as a result of the modern “war on drugs”.

Offered worldwide, available at Amazon.

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[Free eBook] The Reluctant Belligerent: American Entry into World War II by Robert A. Divine [Political History]

The Reluctant Belligerent: American Entry into World War II by Robert A. Divine, a professor emeritus at the University of Texas, is a vintage World War II history book, free for a limited time courtesy of publisher Endeavour Press.

This was originally published in 1965 by McGraw-Hill and was later updated with a second edition in 1979, which is now reprinted here.

The book focuses more on the diplomatic aspects of international relations between the US and others during the lead up to World War II in the 1930s, drawing upon then-current research findings (circa the 1970s) to examine the possibility that the US’ ostensibly neutral foreign policy at the time may have added to the eventual severity of the war, as well as the various factors contributing to the policy.

Offered worldwide, available at Amazon.

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[Free eBook] This Shining Woman: Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin 1759-1797 by Marjorie Bowen [18th C Author Biography]

This Shining Woman: Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin 1759-1797 by the late English author Marjorie Bowen, a prolific multi-genre novelist who wrote under many other pseudonyms during the early mid-20th century and had several works adapted to film, is a biography of the notable 18th century author and proto-feminist, free for a limited time courtesy of publisher Endeavour Press.

This was originally published in 1937 by Collins using the pseudonym George R. Preedy.

This vintage biography examines the unorthodox personal life and formative influences of the 18th century British author Mary Wollstonecraft, who in addition to being the mother of Mary Shelley of Frankenstein fame, was a pioneering writer in her own right and author of A Vindication of the Rights of Women, one of the earliest works of feminist philosophy, in addition to a number of other literary works also briefly covered in this.

Offered worldwide, available at Amazon.

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[Free eBook] Curiosity: How Science Became Interested in Everything by Philip Ball [Science & Cultural History]

Curiosity: How Science Became Interested in Everything by British author Philip Ball, an award-winning science writer and former editor of the Nature journal, is an accessibly-written science and technology development history, free for a limited time courtesy of the University of Chicago Press

This is their featured Free Book of the Month for May.

The book explores the history of the rise of modern science, focusing on the 16th through 18th centuries as curiosity and questioning of the established worldview became more acceptable in the western world, leading to increased popularity of scientific notions and methods with a look at the early scientists and inventions that were inspired by them, as well as the ensuing influence on literature, culture, and international relations sparked by the new interest, alongside musings on the role of curiosity in the present day.

Offered worldwide through May, available directly from the university’s website.

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[Free eBook] The New Spies: Exploring the Frontiers of Espionage by James Adams [20th C Global Espionage History]

The New Spies: Exploring the Frontiers of Espionage by English author James Adams, a former Sunday Times journalist who apparently had significant ties to the intelligence community, is a 20th century recent history and analysis of global intelligence agencies, free for a limited time courtesy of publisher Endeavour Press.

This was originally published in 1994 by Hutchinson, and was later reprinted by Pimlico with a new preface providing an update on developments in the then-current Aldrich Ames CIA case.

The book comprehensively examines and explains post-Cold War developments in global intelligence agencies and how they were adapting and changing to then rapidly-altering political climate (circa the early 1990s) as well as their goals and methods, paying attention to the many uses of espionage, including for economic purposes as well as drugs and terrorism tracking.

Offered worldwide, available at Amazon.

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[Free eBook] Dirty Rotten Scoundrels by Matthew Benns [Australian True Crime History]

Dirty Rotten Scoundrels by Australian author Matthew Benns, a journalist and author of assorted nonfiction bestsellers, is an Australian true crime history, free for a limited time courtesy of publisher HarperCollins.

This book, which is tilted towards the pop entertainment side but provides plenty of dates and references, gives an account of con artists in Australia throughout history, from the 19th century to the present day and ranging in type from relatively harmless literary hoaxers to devastating personal scammers and financial fraudsters, with case studies detailing their exploits and methods and the lasting effects upon their victims.

Offered in the US only, available at Kobo only, from the looks of it.

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