[Free eBook] A Close Run Thing: The Navy and the Falklands War by Richard Freeman [1980s Military History Essay]

A Close Run Thing: The Navy and the Falklands War by Richard Freeman, an historical novelist and naval historian, not to be confused with the cryptozoologist or the economist of the same name, is an historical military conflict essay, free for a limited time courtesy of publisher Endeavour Press.

This was originally published in 1992.

This essay serves as a quick introduction, with brief retrospective analysis and further reading recommendations, to a particular naval operation during the summer of 1982 in the Falklands War conflict with Argentina, as the British Royal Navy sought to reclaim the islands with an ambitiously large amphibious landing.

Offered worldwide, available at Amazon.

Free for a limited time @ Amazon (should be available worldwide).

Description
In 1982, Argentina invaded the Falkland Islands, triggering the last great naval battle of the 20th-century. The British Task Force sent to re-claim the islands was the largest amphibious landing since D-day in the Second World War.

In this ground-breaking essay, the acclaimed naval historian Richard Freeman tells the story of Royal Navy in that momentous campaign. The ships had to transport the men, their machines and equipment, but also to supply them at a distance of nearly 8000 miles from their home ports. This the Navy did while under constant attack from missile-laden Argentine aircraft. The cost was high, with around 1,000 killed and wounded sailors and the loss of seven ships, twenty-four helicopters and ten fighter planes.

This dramatic, enthralling book tells the story of the naval war, and the men and ships who fought it. At the time the whole operation was hazardous in view of the depleted state of the Fleet. Today it would be impossible.

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Author: Alexander the Drake

The public persona of a private person.

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